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  • Rob Elphick

    At the 40:40 mark in this 2014 conference message on Romans 8 (https://www.desiringgod.org/messages/free-from-judgment-fighting-sin-full-assurance), Piper discusses the meaning of the word ‘for’ that connects Romans 8 verses 1 and 2. As background, he explains that in both English and Greek we use the word ‘for’ for two types of grounds: (1) a ground that is a ‘cause’ (e.g. “I’m hungry for (because) I skipped breakfast”), and (2) a ground that is an ‘outcome/evidence’ (e.g. “I’m hungry for (the evidence is) my stomach is growling”. The first of these is a cause, the second is an outcome or evidence.

    He argues that the ‘for’ that connects Romans 8 verses 1 and 2 is the second type, and paraphrases as follows: “For the evidence is plain (!), the spirit has been poured out into your life and you are being changed and defeating the law of sin as an outcome of having been justified, in response to which God poured the Holy Spirit into your life and begin to change you.”

    My question is: Should we use the Ground connector to show this second type (outcome/evidence) of Ground relationship, or is there a better way to show this type of relationship?

    posted in Discourse (Arcing / Bracketing) read more
  • Rob Elphick

    Thanks Brent. This is a very helpful passage. How should we apply this? Three thoughts to start with: (1) In our interaction with other believers, our confidence must be based on our shared status and hope in Jesus. That is, we must not approach these relationships with any sense of superiority or inferiority based on, for example, nationality or ethnicity. We are members of God’s household, enjoying peace with God and other believers, on the merit of Christ alone. (2) Gentiles (like me) who have trusted in Jesus and so now have access to the Father once did not. We are called to remember our previous alienation and its utter hopelessness. In remembering, we are reminded of the tremendous privilege of membership in God’s household - we must not take this for granted or neglect it. (3) The purpose of Christ’s work on the cross was to bring peace with God; to reconcile both Jew and Gentile to God. Our actions and attitudes towards other believers should be characterised by great humility.

    posted in Passage discussions read more
  • Rob Elphick

    Is it possible to cut a segment (e.g. a few verses) from an arc, for example when I want to write a devotional and perhaps create a Published Page focussing only on that segment. I know one way to do this is to create a copy of the larger arc and then delete the verses above and below the bit I want to focus on, and delete all the dot notes. Is there another way?

    posted in Discourse (Arcing / Bracketing) read more