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  • Brent Karding

    @Wellington-Driedger It is a little tedious to use, but things will be improved when Biblearc 3.0 is released. (There’s no release date yet, though.)

    But you can highlight more than one word at a time; you can click and drag your mouse across as many words as you want, and highlight them all at once.

    posted in Read read more
  • Brent Karding

    Thanks for your suggestions! We will keep them in mind as we develop the new version of the app.

    posted in Notes read more
  • Brent Karding

    Hi δούλος,

    This is actually an easy thing to fix, thankfully! If you click on the “NASB” above your phrase, you should see an option for two-column view. That will make the change.

    posted in Phrasing read more
  • Brent Karding

    @John-Mark-Steel said in Ecclesiastes 5:8-9:

    The phrase “the king who cultivates the field is an advantage,” then, has a bit of sarcasm (or resignation), it seems.

    That’s possible! “After all,” though, is a translation of the Hebrew ו (vav), which can mean many, many things, like “and,” “but,” and so on. Translations vary: the ESV has “but,” the CSB, NIV, and NET Bible have nothing.

    The ESV translates the verse as a contrary point to verse 8: “But this is gain for a land in every way: a king committed to cultivated fields.”

    The NET Bible makes the same point as the CSB and NIV, but in a more paraphrastic way: “The produce of the land is seized by all of them, even the king is served by the fields.” In this case, verse 9 is another example of injustice.

    posted in Passage discussions read more
  • Brent Karding

    There hasn’t been an update, I don’t think, but sometimes the print feature does this. At other times it will print correctly.

    I suggest restarting the page or trying a different browser, and you’ll be able to get it to print properly.

    posted in Phrasing read more
  • Brent Karding

    @John-Mark-Steel said in Ecclesiastes 5:8-9:

    Am I on the right track here with these verses? I’m especially interested in the relationships between ideas in these verses.

    Well, when I studied these verses a few years ago, I saw that commentators call them very difficult to interpret, if not impossible to do so with 100% confidence! But it looks like they are surely talking about injustice,

    It looks like the Preacher is saying, “Don’t be amazed when you see governmental injustice, because of the many layers of authority there.” Butt-covering will always be a reality in the structure of authority in organizations. Bureaucracy naturally leads to injustice - that’s the “because.”

    So I think he is calling us to acknowledge the “vanity” (impossible-to-understandness) of corruption in government. About the laziness, the protection of bad workers, the layers of authority that work against efficiency and ensure some level of mismanagement, the Preacher says, “Of course it’s that way! Always has been, always will.” This author isn’t holding his breath for improvement – not that we shouldn’t try to root out corruption; it’s just that, as Derek Kidner put it, “Qoheleth … knows what is in man" (The Message of Ecclesiastes, 55).

    And I really like your comparison of these verses to modern events, and to God’s good gift of government that is twisted by sinful people, just like all his good gifts.

    posted in Passage discussions read more
  • Brent Karding

    @Nathan-B said in Psalm 133:

    However, is there a possibility that the ‘there’ refers to the unity in verse 1? That the blessing of God and life everlasting are connected to living in unity. Not sure, but it seems to be a possibility.

    That’s a good thought, and it’s important to consider different options when interpreting the text. Here are two reasons why I don’t think that “there” is referring to “unity”:

    1. “There” is more likely referring to something must closer to it than a word or concept introduced at the beginning of the psalm, several verses back. This is the most natural way to read it, absent any clear contextual clues.
    2. If “there” is referring to unity, the argument would be this: “Dwelling in unity is pleasant because that is where God commanded the blessing of eternal life.” But what does it mean to say that unity is where God commanded a blessing? I would have expected a different word, not one that shows location, like “through.” Also, how is eternal life located (even figuratively) within unity? Wouldn’t that be a result of unity, rather than unity being the place where eternal life is located or found?

    posted in Passage discussions read more
  • Brent Karding

    That’s a helpful suggestion. I think it would require a lot of coding to accomplish, though. @Andy-Hubert, what do you think?

    posted in Read read more
  • Brent Karding

    @John-Mark-Steel No problem! After posting the passage for the arc, you can just click “reply” like you did a minute ago, and then click on the cloud button at the right of the menu (which is just below “Replying to ‘Cantar de los Cantares 3:1-5’”). That’s how to attach an image of your arc from the Discourse module that you’ve already saved to your computer. Of course, you can also type in whatever notes you want.

    posted in Passage discussions read more
  • Brent Karding

    Hi, John Mark!

    Did you mean to post an arc underneath this passage as well?

    posted in Passage discussions read more